A natural approach to family life

JUNO is a print and digital bi-monthly magazine which inspires and supports parents as they journey through the challenges of parenting. We have an ethos based on conscious parenting, sustainability, social justice, non-violence and a commitment to personal growth and spiritual awareness.

  • One family’s story of autism and the journey to diagnosis

    One family’s story of autism and the journey to...

    It was September 2018. Llewelyn was 2 years 9 months and his journey into part-time education was about to begin. Like every parent, my husband and I were filled with excitement – so many adventures awaited him. But, deep down, I was anxious. I remember the other children as we stood in line waiting for the nursery doors to open. Some were playing happily together in the playhouse – shouting, laughing and singing nursery rhymes – each one acutely aware of the others. How I longed for Llew to join them. There was nothing glaringly wrong when Llew was born, but on numerous occasions, my gut told me something was ‘off’. To this day, I cannot pinpoint what it was, but I felt it. As the weeks went by, it was not long before his differences became apparent to his teachers. He was the child who was always running out of...

    One family’s story of autism and the journey to diagnosis

    It was September 2018. Llewelyn was 2 years 9 months and his journey into part-time education was about to begin. Like every parent, my husband and I were filled with...

  • Child sat on grass, playing with mud in bowls

    Encouraging our children to be wonderful wild b...

    As a picture book author-illustrator, I am always subconsciously looking for another story or image. I try to look for something that speaks to me, ideally something that grabs me and ignites enough interest and passion to convert it into words and art. Usually, it hits when I least expect it, as with the story of my latest picture book, Wild Beings. I watched our young son playing with a bunch of friends in our garden, and it dawned on me how they were all more akin to wild animals than civilised, domesticated humans. Jumping in puddles, climbing rocks, swinging from trees is what lights these young humans up. Messy hair, muddy feet, squeals of joy and screams of excitement are commonplace. You might have one of these wildlings at home. I know some who are positively feral. The way most children would rather run and jump than walk. The...

    Encouraging our children to be wonderful wild beings

    As a picture book author-illustrator, I am always subconsciously looking for another story or image. I try to look for something that speaks to me, ideally something that grabs me...

  • A grandmother of three reflects on the formative years

    A grandmother of three reflects on the formativ...

    I believe that the first five years of life are crucially formative, a foundation on which the personality of the child is built. As adults, we have daunting responsibility. If we are so busy with our adult lives that we are unable to become as children ourselves in order to respond with directness and clarity to the steady gazes that are so willing to trust and encounter us, we miss out on the beauty and joy of those early years. This dance of call and response is, to me, crucial for healthy development. When our needs and interests clash (as they most certainly will) with the needs and interests of our children, there can be much disharmony and angst. Even in the most difficult of circumstances, a light touch of awareness and humour can allow us to see the ‘knee-jerk’ and unnecessary knots that we tie ourselves up in. Children...

    A grandmother of three reflects on the formative years

    I believe that the first five years of life are crucially formative, a foundation on which the personality of the child is built. As adults, we have daunting responsibility. If...

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  • Sharing real stories about breastfeeding through photographs

    Sharing real stories about breastfeeding throug...

    Jade Langton Evans is inspired to share real stories about breastfeeding through photographs, to support mothers and educate young people In 2014 I became a mother. It changed my concept of the world in every way. I questioned everything. I hadn’t thought about breastfeeding very much at all prior to that, yet when I had my baby it was a completely natural instinct. However, when I got home from the hospital for my first night I had a screaming baby and engorged and painful breasts. My nipples felt like they were on fire. Another thing that bothered me was not being able to get up quickly enough to calm and feed my baby, because I had had a c-section. I also realised that I didn’t know anything about breastfeeding. My husband suggested that perhaps we should use a bottle if it was too difficult. Well, I won’t write the words...

    Sharing real stories about breastfeeding through photographs

    Jade Langton Evans is inspired to share real stories about breastfeeding through photographs, to support mothers and educate young people In 2014 I became a mother. It changed my concept...

  • Homeopathy to help with common breastfeeding challenges

    Homeopathy to help with common breastfeeding ch...

    We are so lucky here in the UK to have free access to fantastic support in the form of breastfeeding counsellors who belong to amazing charities such as La Leche League GB (LLLGB) and the Association of Breastfeeding Mothers, offering mother-to-mother support. It is easy to reach for the doctor, midwife, health visitor or homeopath when first encountering breastfeeding problems, but in many cases an effective course of action may be to speak to a breastfeeding counsellor first. A breastfeeding counsellor’s extensive training means she will tell you immediately if you need to speak to your health professional. Unfortunately, breastfeeding education isn’t extensive amongst health professionals, and conversations can sometimes be difficult, so speaking to a breastfeeding counsellor first will really help you. Being supported by someone belonging to LLLGB, for example, means being supported by someone belonging to the international authority on breastfeeding. Here are a few of the...

    Homeopathy to help with common breastfeeding challenges

    We are so lucky here in the UK to have free access to fantastic support in the form of breastfeeding counsellors who belong to amazing charities such as La Leche...

  • Why we might experience breastfeeding aversion

    Why we might experience breastfeeding aversion

    “When she latches, I just feel overwhelmed with anger and I get this rush that makes me want to take her off and leave the room. I just hate it all. I don’t really know why it happens – we had such a good breastfeeding journey. It was a total shock when I first felt like that, and the guilt afterwards makes me feel I’ve failed as a mother.” Anabelle, Nottingham We don’t often hear about mothering with such negative emotions, especially when we think of breastfeeding and all the images of love that we see. Yet, many authors, like Jacqueline Rose in Mothers: An Essay On Love and Cruelty, and Naomi Stadlen in What Mothers Do: Especially When It Looks Like Nothing,write not only about a mother’s love, but hate as well, and how they are inseparable. Many of us don’t know that in the 15th century, motherhood didn’t carry expectations of feelings, nor the notion...

    Why we might experience breastfeeding aversion

    “When she latches, I just feel overwhelmed with anger and I get this rush that makes me want to take her off and leave the room. I just hate it all. I...

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  • Naturally Talented: reframing dyslexia as an advantage

    Naturally Talented: reframing dyslexia as an ad...

    What if we could remove the stigma associated with a diagnosis of dyslexia? What if we could get people to see it as a potential advantage, rather than a setback? What if, in the process, we could vastly improve our children’s experience of their dyslexia?  A diagnosis of dyslexia is too often a cause of great concern and worry for both parent and child. Why? Because it is seen as a ‘difficulty’; a ‘disadvantage’ or a ‘disability’. Even the word ‘dyslexia’ translates as ‘a difficulty with language’! It stems from the combination of two Greek words: ‘dis’ meaning ‘lack’, and ‘lexi’ meaning ‘word’. So, dyslexia means ‘to lack words’. Hardly surprising then that in a society which relies heavily on written communication, ‘lacking words’ has been seen as a definite drawback. Historically there has been very little support for those with dyslexia. It has often been misunderstood, overlooked or misdiagnosed. No...

    Naturally Talented: reframing dyslexia as an advantage

    What if we could remove the stigma associated with a diagnosis of dyslexia? What if we could get people to see it as a potential advantage, rather than a setback?...

  • An introduction to Steiner Waldorf early childhood education

    An introduction to Steiner Waldorf early childh...

    Steiner Waldorf education is founded on the work of the Austrian philosopher and educator Rudolf Steiner, who wished to create a form of education that would help pupils achieve “clarity of thought, sensitivity of feeling and strength of will”. After listening to Steiner’s lectures to the workers at the Waldorf-Astoria cigarette factory in Stuttgart, Emil Molt, the director, asked him to form a school for their children, and in 1919 the first Waldorf school was founded. Today there are more than 1,000 schools and almost 2,000 kindergartens in over 65 countries, serving children from birth to 18 years of age. Steiner spoke about the developmental stages spanning 7-year periods. The phase of early childhood (the first 7 years) includes parenting, home childcare and pregnancy, baby groups – which may include the Pikler approach – parent-and-child groups (birth to age 3), playgroups, nursery groups (ages 2 to 4), and day care...

    An introduction to Steiner Waldorf early childhood education

    Steiner Waldorf education is founded on the work of the Austrian philosopher and educator Rudolf Steiner, who wished to create a form of education that would help pupils achieve “clarity...

  • Deschooling and the transition to home education

    Deschooling and the transition to home education

    As regular readers will know, I decided upon home education very early on, dabbling in organised education only very briefly at a Steiner Kindergarten. I have never had to say goodbye to my 4-year-old at the school gates, or fight the school system on my children’s behalf, or indulge in mild skulduggery to ensure a place in the best local school. From the start I elected to home educate and did so from a philosophical and pedagogical standpoint. I am aware, though, that many home educators come to their decision after first giving school a try. Some of them will have been in two minds and have decided to try what school has to offer before committing to home education. Others will have become home educators only reluctantly: their children may have been bullied out of the system, or the school may not have been able to meet the special...

    Deschooling and the transition to home education

    As regular readers will know, I decided upon home education very early on, dabbling in organised education only very briefly at a Steiner Kindergarten. I have never had to say...

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  • Testimonials

    "I love knowing I'm not the only one who parents this way." - Mayita


    "Reaffirms and inspires our natural way of parenting and living. Absolutely love JUNO!" - Emma

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    Early Spring - 1 February

    Spring - 1 April

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    Late Summer - 1 August

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    Winter - 1 December

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